Frieze London 2017

September 13, 2017

Sculpture and radical women artists take center stage at this year’s show 

Frieze London 2016. Photograph by Linda Nylind. Courtesy of Linda Nylind/Frieze.
Frieze London 2016. Photograph by Linda Nylind. Courtesy of Linda Nylind/Frieze.

In just three weeks, one of the world's most influential contemporary art fairs, Frieze London, will begin. Frieze London runs from October 5 until October 8, showcasing more than 160 leading galleries from across the world. So, with the clock ticking, it’s time to take a look at what’s on this year.

Part of the art fair is already well underway. For the first time, Frieze Sculpture, London’s largest showcase of major outdoor art, opened in July. It’s a free display in Regent's Park curated by Clare Lilley and it will run right up until the end of Frieze Week on October 8. 

Now in its 15th edition, Frieze London will feature ambitious presentations by international established and emerging artists as well as a non-profit program of artist commissions, films and talks.

Independent curator and scholar, Alison Gingeras, will curate a newly themed gallery section. Sex Work: Feminist Art and Radical Politics features women artists working at the extreme edges of feminist practice since the 1960s. It spans work by Renate Bertlmann, Birgit Jürgenssen, Marilyn Minter, Penny Slinger and Betty Tompkins.

New this year in the Focus section, Ruba Katrib of New York’s SculptureCenter will be co-advisor. Along with returning curator Fabian Schoeneich, they will bring together 34 galleries from Cairo to Berlin, all 12 years or newer. 

Ralph Rugoff  from Hayward Gallery in London will curate Frieze Talks for the first time. The talks will explore how “in an age of ‘alternative facts’, art and artists’ capacity to beguile, disorientate and disrupt conventional notions of ‘the real’ takes on new meanings.”

Other highlights, among the myriad of world-leading galleries on show, include: Allied Editions, whose proceeds support several U.K. public art institutions; the Reading Room, where visitors can meet writers and editors; Frieze Projects, a non-profit program of artists’ commissions; Frieze Film, premiering new film commissions; Frieze Music, with an off-site music program, and special programs by galleries and museums across London.

Frieze London 2016. Photograph by Linda Nylind. Courtesy of Linda Nylind/Frieze.
Frieze London 2016. Photograph by Linda Nylind. Courtesy of Linda Nylind/Frieze.

Director of Frieze Fairs, Victoria Siddall had this to say about this year’s fair: “the list of exhibitors for Frieze London is stronger than ever – from the emerging to the world’s most established – signifying that Frieze Week in this city continues to be a vital hub for international galleries … I’m looking forward to another innovative, thought provoking curated section, this time celebrating radical women artists as well as the ground-breaking role of their galleries. And for the first time, Frieze Sculpture will open in July, creating a free public exhibition of extraordinary outdoor works that will take us through to Frieze Week in October.”

 

 

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