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Crown Fine Art UK (Museums and Exhibitions Division) recently undertook a project on behalf of the Imperial War Museum. Relocating works of art within a museum to enable new, purpose built, long-term storage facilities to be completed, is a labour of love requiring long term commitment.

The Imperial War Museum has a unique collection of art covering all aspects of twentieth and twenty-first century conflict involving Britain, the Commonwealth and other former empire countries. The collection provides more than just a record of conflicts; it also offers a social commentary on change and transformation in society.  It contains extraordinary and valuable artworks by such notable British artists as Paul Nash, Wyndham Lewis, Henry Moore and John Piper. 

In summer 2009 the Imperial War Museum began preparations for the eventual move of the entire art collection to new, state-of–the–art storage.  This involved the temporary relocation of many paintings and drawings followed, in 2010, by a sustained project to move 4,500 artworks to their new home.

The collection includes many great works of art from the Government War Art schemes of the First and Second World Wars, as well as the works commissioned to record the activities of armed forces in peace and war, including the Falklands conflict, the Gulf war, peacekeeping in Bosnia, and current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Relocation work demands not only excellent packing and handling skills but also attention to the detail of identity numbers and movement documentation. The team from Crown Fine Art initially had the job of packing and handling many of the IWM’s large framed canvases into temporary storage together with moving over 2000 paintings and drawings into condensed storage. During the subsequent move in 2010 into the new storage facility they handled, identified, transported and safely installed 4,500 framed artworks.

Jenny said: “It’s vital that our country’s artistic heritage is preserved and protected for posterity and for future enjoyment. The modern storage facility that we have created within the museum means that these works are stored safely and securely so that they can be enjoyed for generations to come.”Crown Fine Art UK (Museums and Exhibitions Division) recently undertook a project on behalf of the Imperial War Museum. Relocating works of art within a museum to enable new, purpose built, long-term storage facilities to be completed, is a labour of love requiring long term commitment.

The Imperial War Museum has a unique collection of art covering all aspects of twentieth and twenty-first century conflict involving Britain, the Commonwealth and other former empire countries. The collection provides more than just a record of conflicts; it also offers a social commentary on change and transformation in society.  It contains extraordinary and valuable artworks by such notable British artists as Paul Nash, Wyndham Lewis, Henry Moore and John Piper. 

In summer 2009 the Imperial War Museum began preparations for the eventual move of the entire art collection to new, state-of–the–art storage.  This involved the temporary relocation of many paintings and drawings followed, in 2010, by a sustained project to move 4,500 artworks to their new home.

The collection includes many great works of art from the Government War Art schemes of the First and Second World Wars, as well as the works commissioned to record the activities of armed forces in peace and war, including the Falklands conflict, the Gulf war, peacekeeping in Bosnia, and current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Relocation work demands not only excellent packing and handling skills but also attention to the detail of identity numbers and movement documentation. The team from Crown Fine Art initially had the job of packing and handling many of the IWM’s large framed canvases into temporary storage together with moving over 2000 paintings and drawings into condensed storage. During the subsequent move in 2010 into the new storage facility they handled, identified, transported and safely installed 4,500 framed artworks.

Jenny said: “It’s vital that our country’s artistic heritage is preserved and protected for posterity and for future enjoyment. The modern storage facility that we have created within the museum means that these works are stored safely and securely so that they can be enjoyed for generations to come.”

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